Get into Water

Get into the Bath
Swimming

Get into the Bath

Take full advantage of the mini-lake in your bathroom. The bath is the place to mold, shape, and even out the clay that is your dough-body of flesh and bone. After a workout, a relaxing bath invites you to continue moving your body in ways that it wants and needs. You can have an entire spontaneous and instinctive workout in the bath, where you can feel body parts and sensations that you cannot on the floor or bed.

Yoga Movment in the BathMany yoga poses and exercises can be done in the bath, including your own bathtub variations of some of the floor exercises. Skin, water, and oils you have used during your workout or self-massage mingle as you relax onto your knuckles or slide your body along open hands in weightlessness. From yoga’s first sitting position (photo, right), I follow my instincts. While in this position, a good place to start is to pull your fingers through your toes while squeezing them against your fingers. This awakens your legs and calls your attention to sleeping toes and other areas that need work.

Exercises that seem difficult or impossible become doable in the bath (for example, triceps dips and push-ups). There is a yoga posture that involves lifting the body off the floor from the first sitting position (as Pascale is shown doing). Whenever I have attempted this, absolutely nothing happens—my arms seem to be too short to lift so much of me away from the floor—but in the bath, I can do it.

The tub itself can be used as an agonist-antagonist tool. For example, you can push your knees against the walls of the tub—an effective way to disentangle the muscles around the trochanter.

Knuckling the sacrum (or other bones of your lower back), by propping yourself on your knuckles, is made possible by the buoyancy of the water. While lying relaxed, press starfish fingers—see “Self-touches”—against the trochanters.

Many yoga poses and exercises can be done in the bath, including your own bathtub variations of some of the floor exercises: “Overhead Stretches”; “Tantrums”; “Knees to Chest”; “Bicycle”; and “Three Small Crunches”. You can also experiment with hand exercises and foot exercises, like Windshield Wiper Feet, and Knife Hands.

Lying on one side and then the other, awaken each side by experimenting with triangles and fours, using agonist-antagonist at the same time.

Get on all-fours; practice moving around and lifting your own weight a bit at a time. Spend some time after exercising just relaxing in the tub, feeling, massaging, and enjoying.

For more about exercising in water, see “Swimming”.

Bathtub-Resistance

Some of us absolutely cannot get into and out of a bathtub, while others of us simply have bathtub resistance (do not like getting into a bathtub), or have insurmountable problems that keep them from enjoying bath work. To partially enjoy bathtub-resistance training without getting into a bathtub, use these movements and exercises, but do them on a bed:

If you can get into and out of a tub, but with some difficulty, then let getting out of the tub become your day’s exercise; the work you do in the tub contributes to making it easier to get out of the tub. Place a sturdy, stable chair beside the tub. Clear any ledges, edges, or other strong surfaces that you can use to support yourself. Place one or more rubber mats on the bottom of the tub (these provide a lot of traction and stability).

Practice by rehearsing your exit from the tub, by lifting and supporting your weight, using varying combinations of arms and legs. Take advantage of the water’s buoyancy by getting out of the tub before emptying it. Move slowly, and lift yourself slightly (using first one leg, then the other), using the ledges, edges, and chair for support. Repeat this as many times as you like. Get out by any combination of positions and movements that works for you!

Swimming

Swimming is broadly known as one of the most complete forms of exercise—one that uses almost all of the major muscle groups and can be enjoyed by anyone of any age, amateur or professional. The resistance of the water slows you down, with two immediate benefits: all muscles work harder while you move through water; your joints are spared from harmful banging and smashing. The result is a more intense workout with less impact, making it very easy to apply the principles of Gliding to swimming.

Less well known is the important relationship between swimming and breathing.

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Summary
Get into Water - Swimming And Bathtub Exercises
Article Name
Get into Water - Swimming And Bathtub Exercises
Description
Swimming is broadly known as one of the most complete forms of exercise—one that uses almost all of the major muscle groups and can be enjoyed by anyone of any age, amateur or professional. The resistance of the water slows you down, with two immediate benefits: all muscles work harder while you move through water; your joints are spared from harmful banging and smashing - less impact.
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